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Why Educators Blog

June 23, 2012

I have found three excellent examples of secondary English teachers who blog regularly. I added all of them to my favorites bar so that I can keep up with them. They are inspirational, and they have a lot of resources.

I couldn’t find a picture of Mr. B-G on any of his blogs. I thought this online award he was nominated for was very fitting.

Mr. B-G is first, with his English Blog. Mr. B-G is a high school English teacher from Massachusetts. He is an avid blogger who maintains more than four blogs.  In addition to his English blog, he has blogs dedicated to student blogging, teacher resources, and journalism. He also maintains blogs for each of the classes that he teaches.

Mr B-G says that blogging has become entwined with nearly every aspect of his life and career. He uses blogging for student work, peer review, editing and revisions, and more during writing. Blogs enable students to easily revise and submit their work. Blogging has provided Mr B-G with a place to compile resources for his students, and for other teachers.  There are dozens of links on all of his blogs to other educational blogs and other useful websites that pertain to each subject. It also allows him to network with other teachers who can provide resources and support. Finally, it is a place to reflect on teaching in order to grow as an educator. It’s a place where he can express his success stories, as well as his frustration.

The next great blog I found is called Two Writing Teachers. As the title suggests, it’s written by both Ruth Ayres

Two Writing Teachers

and Stacey Shubitz. They  live over 500 miles apart, but they collaborate for conferences, books, and this blog. There goal is to support other teachers. They offer a place where teacher’s can “let their barriers down” and focus on professional development. Like Mr B-G, they also offer resources that they have discovered. They network with other teachers to share resources and offer support. It is also a way for them to reflect on their teaching -“celebrating when it goes well, and working it out when it doesn’t.” As writing teachers, they also think its important to model sharing and publishing their written work for their students.

Catlin Tucker

Catlin Tucker is another high school English teacher who takes advantage of blogging. She blogs for much of the same reasons as the previous three writers. Blogging serves as a way to reflect on her teaching, and to network with other teachers. Tucker’s blog is full of lesson plan ideas, useful websites and blogs, activities, and much more. It is a place where she can collaborate with other teachers. She can get and share ideas and feedback with them.

I have read a few blogs here and there, but never followed one regularly. These three blogs have been very inspiring to me. They are full of so many resources. I will use blogging in much the same way these teachers do. I will use it for my actual instruction. I think it is a way that students can easily edit, access, and submit their work. I can leave them feedback that they can see instantly. It make online class discussion possible. Blogging also makes class more interesting. Today’s students are very tech savvy. They will be more interested in a class that is geared more towards the use of technology. Because it’s something that they already know and love, they are more interested in the lessons and assignments.

I will also use blogging for my own professional development. I will network with other teachers to share ideas and get feedback on them. I think it is also important for teacher to be able to reflect on their lessons. Reflecting on accomplishments motivates and inspires us to continue to work for them. On the other hand, reflecting on shortcomings helps us to understand what we need to fix for the future. Getting support from other teachers is also important. Knowing that other teachers have struggled in the same areas is reassuring. It allows us to learn from others and to grow as an educator.

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